Thursday, 19 August 2010

Canon Rebel XS 10.1MP Digital SLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (Black)

For perfect photos, fast and simple, there's nothing better than Canon's new EOS Rebel XS. With powerful features including a 10.1-megapixel CMOS sensor, Canon's DIGIC III processor, fast shooting and more, it's a digital powerhouse. With simple, easy-to-use controls, a compact design, a 2.5-inch LCD monitor, and Live View Function, it's a beginner's dream come true.

Canon Rebel XS 10.1MP Digital SLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (Black)


Canon EOS Rebel XS Highlights
10.1-megapixel CMOS sensor

10.1-megapixel CMOS sensor Canon’s CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) sensor captures images with exceptional clarity and tonal range, and offers the most pixels in its class. It offers many of the same new technologies first seen in Canon’s professional EOS-1D Mark III to maximize each pixel's light gathering efficiency. It’s an APS-C size sensor (22.2 x 14.8mm), and there's an effective 1.6x increase in the lens’s marked focal length when attached. Canon’s DIGIC III Image Processor dramatically enhances image quality and speeds up all camera operations for intuitive operation. It works in concert with the EOS Rebel XS’s sensor to achieve unprecedented levels of performance in all lighting situations.

DIGIC III Image Processor Developed to maximize performance between the capture and recording stages of digital photography, the EOS Rebel XS’s DIGIC III Image Processor works hand in hand with Canon’s CMOS sensor to achieve even higher levels of performance. The entire electronic system is totally redesigned, giving the camera its incredible combination of speed and image quality. Digital noise is significantly reduced in shadow areas, and color reproduction is superior.


Saturday, 14 August 2010

Nikon D3x 24.5MP FX Digital SLR (Body Only)

Nikon is proud to announce the new 24.5-megapixel FX-format (35.9 x 24.0mm) D3X digital SLR camera! Joining the award-winning 12.1-megapixel D3, the D3X brings extreme resolution performance to Nikon professional flagship-level D-SLRs. The D3X was meticulously engineered for professional photographers whose assignments demand nothing less than the ability to capture extreme fidelity, detail and nuance in ways now made possible with the amazing D3X.

Nikon Extreme Digital SLR Image Quality


In the studio or on location, the D3X faithfully captures NEF (RAW) files that, when processed, are approximately 138 MB! Of course, neither a Nikon 24.5-megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor nor 138 MB files are of value unless they deliver truly superior image quality. And in this regard, the new D3X exceeds expectations. Like its 12.1-megapixel D3 counterpart, the D3X features Nikon’s exclusive EXPEED image processing technologies teamed with the proprietary Nikon Scene Recognition System to ensure the utmost in image fidelity, low noise, faster, more accurate autofocus and amazing file processing speed that makes continuous shooting at up to five frames per second possible. In addition, the D3X’s ISO sensitivity range of 100 to 1600 (with Lo1, 50 and Hi 2 up to 6400) is mindful of the needs of photographers specializing in commercial, fashion and fine art photography.
 
Nikon D3x 24.5MP FX Digital SLR (Body Only)

The Nikon D3X--meticulously engineered for professional assignments that demand nothing less than extreme 24.5-megapixel, FX-format image performance. In the studio or on location, the D3X faithfully captures NEF (RAW) files that, when processed, exceed 138 MB. Nikon's exclusive EXPEED image processing technologies support extremely low-noise and faster, more accurate 51-point autofocus with 4 Dynamic AF modes, including 3D Focus Tracking. EXPEED also enables fast processing of massive amounts of data, allowing continuous shooting at up to 5fps. A bright 3-inch super-density 920,000-dot LCD monitor offers precise image review, along with 27x magnification for precise focus confirmation in Live View. Responsive handling and more top off the D3X's professional potency.


Customer Reviews

By Low Hounds
Owned a D3 for one and a half years and traded in for the D3x after trying out the new model for a day. My review is not about price - for the record I think Nikon stretched the barrier on the price point for this which I am not happy about - but as far as performance goes I am happy. The D3x results is are perceptibly superior for landscape and macro photography - which is what I typically shoot - even on just A3+ prints.... so I can imagine that the results would be that much better for larger sizes. Just as many of you, I have also read arguments on the net re the megapixel myth ad nauseam and was half convinced about it but nothing speaks as clearly as prints (and I'm comparing studio shots of the same subject taken with the two different cameras).


Have not tried the D3x for sports photography yet but I suspect that unless you are shooting either motor-sports or winter sports, the moderately slower 5fps in large FX mode compared with the 7fps for the D3 is not going to be an issue.

I also spent a day with the Sony Alpha-900 given that is the only other player in a similar mega-pixel category. The output was all right but overall just not in the same league as the D3x in terms of handling, build quality etc etc (I'm probably biased as I am very familiar with Nikon controls - just found the Sony too 'fiddly' and 'plasticky' and couldn't see myself spending hours with it without getting irritated).

Early days with the camera but so far it feels like one of the best DSLR's I have used especially when the medium format alternatives would involve rendering my large pile of Nikon lenses useless and the replacement cost would be prohibitive. As mentioned earlier the D3x pricing is a different issue altogether and I think that the right price point would have been around $2K lower......will update if and when I discover any shortfalls or glitches.

Thursday, 12 August 2010

Nikon Coolpix L110 12 MP Digital Camera with 15x Optical Vibration Reduction (VR) Zoom and 3.0-Inch LCD (Red)

Product Description
Nikon Coolpix L110 12 MP Digital Camera with 15x Optical Vibration Reduction (VR) Zoom and 3.0-Inch LCD.12.1 Megapixels for stunning prints as large as 16 x 20 inches

Incredible 15x Optical Wide-Angle (28-420mm) Zoom-NIKKOR Glass Lens - quality optics provide exceptional images throughout the zoom range. The lens is built on a proud heritage of producing precision camera optics that delivers superb color and razor-sharp results. This incredible lens offers versatile compositional freedom with its wide-angle (28mm) to super telephoto coverage (420mm). Sweeping landscapes can be captured as well as those zoomed-in close-ups of the action on the baseball or soccer field!

Big, Bright 3.0-inch High Resolution HVGA (460,000-dot) Clear Color Display makes it easy to compose and share your pictures with a wide-viewing angle and Clear Color Display anti-glare coating.

HD Movie with HDMI Output 720p HD movie recording at 30fps with optical zoom and autofocus capabilities during recording (TBD). Recording made better with stereo sound built-in microphone, dedicated movie-record button and HDMI output for easy in camera playback or on your TV or computer.

Nikon Coolpix L110 12 MP Digital Camera with 15x Optical Vibration Reduction (VR) Zoom and 3.0-Inch LCD (Red)
Customer Reviews

By James A. Anderson
If you want to move up from a pocket size point and shoot camera to one with a 15X zoom, this is a good choice. The picture quality equals many point and shoot cameras, and the 15X zoom and anti-shake features allow you a great deal more flexibilty. Without casting any negativity on reviewers who gave unfavorable ratings, I can only assume that they didn't set the camera on 'auto mode' which does permit you to set the flash mode, and allows some white balance compensation. You can also pick Nikon's preset camera modes, but 'auto mode' works best. Does the picture quality equal a digital slr camera? Of course not. Are the quality of pictures equal to my Canon SD1000 point and shoot? Yes. Is it priced like a 15X zoom digital slr? No.


The camera's viewfinder/playback screen is one of the camera's other highlights. It has a very high pixel count and is the same as one used on Nikon's higher priced digital camera. The HD video recording approaches that of a mid priced HD camcorder. I had NO problems playing back HD movies on any of my HD TVs, and I don't understand the complaints about poor picture quality, bad flash pictures, and poor HD video. I can only assume people didn't understand the directions, which aren't the best, left the camera in 'easy mode', which is how it is set out of the box, or they got defective units and simply should have exchanged them. While this camera probably isn't exceptional in any one category, it performs very well across almost all categories and is a steal in the performance vs price segment

Monday, 9 August 2010

Nikon 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G ED IF Autofocus VR Nikkor Zoom Lens

The AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED lens adds a powerful third zoom lens to Nikon's line of Vibration Reduction (VR) lenses. VR is an advanced Nikon technology that overcomes one of the fundamental problems photographers face while photographing under conditions where it is difficult to hold the camera steady. VR technology helps eliminate image blur caused by camera shake, particularly when shooting in low-light conditions, allowing photographers to use shutter speeds about three times slower than they would ordinarily use to get sharp, well exposed images.
Nikon 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G ED IF Autofocus VR Nikkor Zoom Lens


In addition to a compact design for easier handling, the AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED lens features Nikon's exclusive Silent Wave Motor Technology for fast, accurate and nearly silent focusing as well as a broad 5x zoom range that covers a variety of picture taking conditions from wide scenic landscapes to dramatic portraits and close-up pictures. Its VR technology offers photographers a wider range of picture taking conditions, while ensuring consistently sharp images. The versatility the AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED lens makes it an ideal addition to any Nikon photographer's camera bag.

The AF-S VR Zoom Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED offers a versatile focal range from wide-angle to telephoto and also gives photographers an unprecedented control over their pictures in a wide variety of difficult and tricky situations.






Monday, 2 August 2010

Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

Canon’s new EOS Rebel T1i is packed with features, both refined and new. In addition to its admirable performance with an all-new 15.1 Megapixel Canon CMOS sensor, DIGIC 4 Image Processor, a 3.0-inch Clear View LCD with anti-reflective and scratch resistant coating, and compatibility with the EOS System of lenses and Speedlites, the EOS Rebel T1i adds remarkable Full HD video capture at resolutions up to 1920 x 1080.

Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens


An HDMI port allows for quick connections to high definition TVs and monitors for easy viewing of your stills and video. The entire operation is simple and easy even if you are a beginner. You’ll have uncompromised EOS Digital performance with power and flexibility right in the palm of your hand.

EOS Rebel T1i Highlights




New 15.1-megapixel CMOS sensor with DIGIC 4 Image Processor

Canon’s CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) sensor captures images with exceptional clarity and tonal range and offers the most pixels in its class. It offers many of the same new technologies as used by Canon’s professional cameras to maximize each pixel’s light gathering efficiency. Its APS-C size sensor creates an effective 1.6x field of view (compared to 35mm format). Canon’s DIGIC 4 Image Processor dramatically speeds up all camera operations for intuitive operation and offers improvements in both fine detail and natural color reproduction. It works in concert with the EOS Rebel T1i’s image sensor to achieve unprecedented levels of performance in all lighting situations.
Customer Reviews

By Rimesh Patel (Washington D.C.)
I've had the T1i for about almost week now and after some extensive use, here are my thoughts:

1. 15.1 megapixel sensor. Yes, the high megapixel count is impressive, but keep in mind that, as you approach higher resolutions, you need to ensure the lens on the SLR can resolve that much detail. Sadly, the included 18-55mm IS lens is functional, but the high resolution really shows the so-so quality of the lens. Even if taken at the proper focus, pictures can appear soft with this kit lens. Shots I have taken with Canon EF-S 17-85mm and EF 70-200mm L lenses are crisp. I don't have any gripes on image quality. There are some issues with noise on the higher ISOs that don't seem to show up on the Nikon digitals, but overall, the quality is amazing for the price. Skin tones, textures, colors are reproduced very accurately.
2. Digic 4. The Digic 4 processor appears to process/save the 15 megapixel images in the same time (if not faster) than the Digic III processor on the XSi (even in RAW+Jpg mode). I have also noticed that at higher ISOs, the sensor and the Digic 4 produce images with less overall noise compared with its predecessors.
3. LCD. The 920,000 pixel LCD screen is large (3"), crisp, vibrant and fully visible even in bright sunlight. In comparison, the Canon XSi SLR (which the T1i replaces), also has a 3" LCD, but with 230,000 pixels. The viewing angle is great as well and the LCD can easily be seen nearly 180 degrees around.
4. ISO 12800. Canon and Amazon are correctly identifying that the T1i maxes out at ISO 3200. Some less reputable dealers are listing an ISO 12800, which you should disregard. The ISO 6400 and 12800 settings are expanded ISO settings. The pictures taken on these two settings are ISO 3200 images pushed to ISO 6400 or 12800 by the Digic 4 chip before saving to the memory card. These pictures are extremely grainy and contain a lot of noise to the point of only being usable as for snapshots or adding an artistic effect to certain compositions.
5. Penta-mirror. That Canon is still using one in the T1i is disappointing. The penta-mirror viewfinder image is functional, but still noticeably darker than that of the penta-prism viewfinder in the Nikon D90 (which is the T1i's main competitor). I really would have preferred if Canon had kept the XSi's 12.2 megapixel sensor, forgone 1080p video altogether, and maybe upped the cost of the camera slightly to cover the production cost of using a penta-prism in the T1i. Honestly, unless you are massively cropping your images, or creating large photos, the difference between 12.2 and 15.1 megapixels really is negligible.
6. Size. This is the same body as the XSi, and therefore a bit on the smaller side compared to other digital SLRs. I have small hands, so the T1i is comfortable for me. If you have big hands, I can see this being a very difficult camera to use over an extended period of time. If you haven't handled a Canon XT, XTi or XSi, I would suggest you go to a store and hold the T1i yourself before purchasing it online. (I will upload a picture of the T1i in my hands to the user gallery for a size reference.)
7. HD Video. Yes, the Canon marketing department made a horrible marketing decision and pushed the T1i onto shelves limiting the 1080p recording to 20fps (frames per second). Recognize this as a marketing gimmick that allows them put a 1080p sticker on the camera box. The 1080p @ 20fps is fine most times, but seems a choppy if you have a lot of action in the frame or are panning quickly. The T1i's 720p video is recorded at 30fps and is clean, smooth, and sufficient for all but the most discerning consumers. One major criticism though is that the sound is recorded in mono, AND there is NO input for an external microphone.
A lot of pre-production reviews of the T1i criticize its inability to automatically autofocus while recording. I wouldn't put much weight in this criticism, mostly because neither of the other two SLR cameras with HD recording capabilities (Canon 5D Mark II and Nikon D90) can automatically autofocus while recording either. What you can do with the T1i is pan/zoom the lens and then press the AE lock (*) button to make the camera autofocus on the new subject (all while recording). A problem with using the AE lock button to have the camera autofocus is that the microphone for the camera is on the front upper left of the body near the lens mount. Therefore, the lens motor noise is picked up just as much as ambient sounds. Even with my quietest Canon USM (ultasonic motor) lenses, this lens motor sound is pretty loud in video playback. Although, remember, you can always manually turn the focusing ring on the lens to get your subject back into focus. It's not easy, but after a little practice, it's not all too hard, either.
Ultimately, you shouldn't let the HD recording limitations sway you one way or the other. This is an SLR camera -- not a video camera. The HD video is a great feature, but if you're looking for something primarily to take video, look elsewhere. There are much better, cheaper VIDEO cameras out there which can record true 1080p.
8. Record button. For some reason, the record video button is next to the LCD screen (the same button used for direct printing). The first few times you take video, you'll intuitively find yourself using the shutter release button used to take pictures. The reason for this switch is that you can take a still picture while recording video, although, doing so will interrupt the recording.
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